• Cannes' Female Troubles: Women Directors Have Always Been Scarce

    6 monthes ago - By The Wrap

    A version of this story appeared in TheWrap's magazine's Cannes issue .
    For decades, the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors. The rarefied club of Cannes-approved art-house auteurs, the filmmakers on whom the festival rests, has simply always been predominantly male.
    Over the years, oversights and snubs have been easy to find. It's hard to imagine, for instance, that directors as esteemed as Agnieszka Holland, Julie Taymor, Mira Nair, Kelly Reichardt or Elaine May haven't warranted spots on the Croisette, or that Agnès Varda hasn't...
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  • Women in Cannes: A Short History of Small Victories and Decades of Male Dominance

    6 monthes ago - By The Wrap

    From the time it first took place in 1946, the Cannes Film Festival has been dominated by male directors. Here are some milestones over the years when they did recognize the contributions of women.
    1946
    Barbara Virginia, the first female Portuguese movie director, also becomes the first woman in competition at Cannes when the inaugural festival accepts her film “Tres Dias Sem Deus” as part of the lineup.
    1954
    For the first time, two women are chosen for the main competition: Carmen Tocano for the documentary “Memories of a Mexican” (which she co-directed with her father Salvador) and...
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